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i'll probably be there six months doing the research what are the immigration things in san francisco and what has the board done in the past. i think i'll follow a long-term goal. to answer your question while i'm building and working on something specific i'd like to implement >> you say you're a student now. >> right. >> what's the plan to manage our time. >> i know they meet on monday at 1 o'clock. i'm halfway you done so the workload is not an issue. i spoke in my conversation that was one of the questions how much time do you do in precipitate work. i was told the meetings don't last more than an hour mayor ed lee and maybe take a couple of hours of prep time >> are tell you pktd any other commissions you'd be interested in. >> one of the questions i answered was i felt i had the rezit skills and references and i don't want to half step anything i want to hit the ground running as fast as i can if i thought there were other commissions but this is the one i actually can come in and do some work. >> do you live in san francisco. >> i do. >> thank you. i have no
didn't see a timothy. >> good afternoon honorable board members. i'm timothy i'm an immigrant from africa and have been in san francisco since 1974. i was the co-founder for african-american desk club. from the bay area board members of the san francisco and the executive director of the commission. i'm currently open the immigrant commission and would like to be reappointed to continue to serve and telephone number continue to serve guideline immigrants for languages and mental health and domestic family issues. i have degrees if mental health and i've been deep involved and work closely with the hardworking staff and my fellow commissioners in passing the due process that on civil immigration that was relevance passed by the board of supervisors. and i sincerely thank you for passing this important ordinance. finally, i'd like to thank the mayor and board of supervisors and our hardworking staff as well as my fellow commissioners and the immigrant living in the bay area especially in san francisco. you have nothing to lose if you reappoint those 6 commissioners we walk closely to
to the immigrant rights commission there are 8 seats and 6 applicant. >> okay. we have the immigrant affairs office here. >> good afternoon chair joe and supervisor breed and supervisor cowen. it's an honor to see you. i think we're at an should not moment in the history of the immigrants rights commission we have a number of should not folks who are interested in joining the commission. the commission has been here for over 16 years and not as effective as it is now. in the past few years the commission has conducted over - we have public safety and federal immigration and that's for protecting community. the commission is also issued several major reports on expensive glths reform and recently held a meeting on the court instructs the jury closer. so today, the commission is recognized for a vicinities for the city's underserved community. this is due in large part because of the partnership with my office. the commissioners that come to meeting they listen to the community, they do all even though heavy lifting on behalf of their fellow commissioners they're a diverse co- he was group th
on their census forms. even if they have their immigration status approved and they do not have to worry about immigration remains a priority. there is a sense of frustration. pass speaker will legislation's piecemeal. secure thefirst borders. that is what i hear a lot from our and stitch units. get immigration reform done. that is a priority -- that is what i hear a lot from our constituents. are very much tied together in my district. boom financially a few years ago. now construction is at an all- time low. tourism is still the driving force in south florida. will not be jobs coming back. we are getting a lot of jobs coming from venezuela and other places that are unstable. a sense of insecurity about the economy in south florida. those issues are what is driving the voters. that unites them is discussed at congress. i am glad to be that unifying force. 6% isot know what that that still approves of us. [laughter] >> immigration reform is something that we have worked on a lot in this congress. you have been one of the key players in the house. do you feel like your role as a woman or as a p
- legal limbo. he passed the bar exam. should this undocumented immigrant be allowed to practice law. we talk to him live. >>> plus, a man with alzheimer's and a stand your ground killing. cz >>> imagine going to law school, taking the bar examine, passing with flying colours and being denied the ability to practice law. that happened to cesar vargas, an honour studio in new york and interned with a state supreme court judge, but he can't practice law because he's an undocumented immigrant brought to the country illegally at the age of 5. cesar vargas is the executive director of the dream bar associate. he joins us to tell us his story. why can't you practice law? >> simply new york committee decided i had the character, an evaluation that every law student and graduate has. unfortunate for them, because of my immigration status they couldn't make a decision. for them it was completely new, this issue. they punt it to the highest court to really deal with the issue. for them my immigration status was something they couldn't sign off, despite the fact that they found my character, as the
could get something done on immigration, that would be awesome. if we could lift the sequester and put forth a budget that could get people back to work, that would be good. i'm not cynical -- >> i'm not cynical either, in this universe in which we live, you and some of your colleagues have an idea for something the president could actually do by himself to increase wages for working people. what is that? >> well, you know, there are about 2 million workers who work for federal contractors. these contractors pay people sub standard wage, $7.45, no benefits, people have been on these jobs for literally years, and an executive order could solve this problem, and so we wrote a letter to the president about two months ago asking him to do something about it. and i gave another letter today. and you know, i think he is not sincere. he gave a wonderful speech about income inequality today. and he urged congress to raise the minimum wage, but in this congress i think we're going to have to look at what the executive can do and doing something with these contractors who pay people sub standard
. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time since 1974 that majority of americans see this country as not powerful, as powerful as a decade ago. they are less respected and think that their country is not important on the global stage and the reason why is the foreign policy. putting obama care aside which is awful, a lot has to do with foreign policy. we saw what happened
hungry. and as an immigrant coming into this country, i was, you know, i had this image that there would be no hunger and this country because, you know, it is the wealthiest country in the world. and it is, ironic that in the wealthiest country in the world and one of the wealthiest cities in the world, san francisco, that there are people, children, families, seniors, who every day, go to bed hungry. and i think that it is really sad, that that is the reality it, for so many people in san francisco. that is why i think that this hearing is so important. and you know, it is around the time of the holidays that perhaps some of these issues have more resonance for folks. but i think that this is really important, we picked up the examiner today and the front page of the examiner today was housing cost and rents and those top concerns for san franciscans and you know that there is a sense of people are being displaced. but, i think that we are forgetting that even basic things like putting the food on the table is something that many people are not able to do. and so, i think that we have
, but they could be immigrants, seniors, homeless, people, with disabilities, and people who may be don't want to go through the hassle factor of accessing cal fresh and the people who remoteness, and would have been a part of the city where they will have to transfer from one bus line to another bus line to get to the office. >> the people who are unaware of the fact that over 500 new applicants a month are applying on-line, using my benefits cal wynn on-line portal that we introduced here in san francisco. about four years ago. and so there is a lot of ways that people can access cal fresh now and they can go to the office and they can apply on-line, and they can work with the partners at the san francisco food bank who has a monthly cal at ther on the website of different places around san francisco, where the people are going, but really what we are looking at at the department of human services, this winter is taking a fairly deep dive into our current caseload, and saying, which people are getting medical and getting healthcare benefits that are not accessing cal fresh but have income l
, the senate passed immigration reform and the nondiscrimination act. they said we passed the keystone pipeline and i cyber security bill. there these large things that are out there that had been passed through one chamber or the other, but they seem to get bogged down with immigration and end up not wanting to go forward on that and they don't want to touch the keystone pipeline. is this a lack of leadership or is this constant 24-7 campaign we are always in that is a by product of this media world with the technology moving and they are getting more power? >> a sign of the times. you look at the level of partisanship and the media that exists, this is again, i can't emphasize enough, we are living in unprecedented times. the productivity is really bad. the potential good news is they can pass a lot of this stuff next year. the congress doesn't end until 2014. we will see what they do next year. >> it's harder in an election year and with all the upgrades we had, it brought congress to a screeching halt. too many people had too many things for all sorts of stuff. fascinating. much more ahead
want to see a gop president again, they must sign on to immigration reform. good news for amnesty advocate. speaker boehner hiring a high-profile adviser that is well known for helping senator john mccain passed amnesty and speaker boehner telling several business individuals that he will start holding immigration votes after the deadline for the 2014 midterm. so maybe we have a sense of what we can expect. you don't have to tell the chamber of commerce that the speaker is working to enact immigration reform. donohue issued everyone that speaker boehner would do exactly that. we will find out. we are back with monica, matt, and david. let's begin with you. we are calling for a recall. >> sooner or later you face your reality and you don't see upward mobility. whatever it is, if you see no future, you don't want to stay home forever home forever and be vacated as a bartender while your parents paid 80,000 foreign education. that is the reality that the me millennial space. and no matter what people want to call obama or his policies if you don't see upward mobility, you can't have
a little bit to another economic policy imperative for the president, immigration reform. i've been wondering, are we going to be able to get immigration reform through the next term? actually, our loan luke russert asked john boehner just that. let's take a look. >> i've been committed to it. i'm stil committed to it. >> are you confident it will be done in 2014? >> i've learned not to make a lot of predictions. >> luke russert on the case. one of the things that gives me some hope is john boehner's hired a new policy adviser. normally you'd say, oh, he hired a new adviser, who cares? this person seems to matter in this conversation. rebecca talent comes from the bipartisan policy center's immigration task force. she was john mccain's chief of staff. she's worked on the hill in terms of immigration reform for a long time. she knows d.c.. she's a smart and sober voice, which signals to me that maybe john boehner is getting a little bit more serious about immigration reform than he's been in the past. >> yeah, i mean, i kind of feel like john boehner has been fairly serious about it
it be immigration, marijuana, mandatory minimum, the aca, what is the remedy for the legislative branch. >> the next recourse, the word that we don't like to say. >> we've also talked about the i word, impeachment, which i don't think would get past the senate in the current climate. am i missing anything? is there anything else we can do? >> there's the guy. how, i think i'm watching buffalo bob and the peanut gallery. i'm too old not to remember that stuff. but let me ask you this. that guy, let's not forget his providence. he was the guy on this show not too long ago who said i will not say the president was legitimately elected president. i gave him three shots at that baby, and he wouldn't do it. he's also illegitimate. i don't know if you can impeach a guy that was not there legitimately. >> and he is on record now saying that the house would vote to impeach this president if they were allowed to have this vote, and he said what else can we do? what's our remedy? well, there really isn't one. so they can have one of these show hearing. yeah, it's an impeachment hearing. >> they're stymied by t
from asian caucus that have done work to support immigration reform. we have so many young people that came to the i see at a young age from a convolute process don't have the same access because of their jobs in the country. they've been courageus about how they can access higher education. and i want to recognize hospitality house jamming i didn't changing is our executive director. when people ask me how we're addressing homelessness in the center it's by hospitality house. one that people go to and they have an arts center. by supporting those organizations it's going to be a wonderful partnership. and seeing people how to golf is a wonderful wonderful thing thank you. again and i want to present this accomodation on the part of the board of supervisors to the d g in our start up incubator where you're beginning our start up we what to thank you for this opportunity for the ribbon cutting (clapping.) thank you very much >> thank you and welcome again. >> thank you (clapping.) thank you very much. okay. now moving on i'd like to ask an important guest to come to the stage h
's relevant now is it uncle was in immigration court this week, threatened with deportation to kenya. he is now staying here, though, we're told. gotten asylum and is staying here. the question was, back in 2011, "the boston globe," when this came about as a case, asked the white house about the nature of the relation. the white house said there was no record of them two meeting. now they're saying, since details came out, they lived together briefly when the president was in massachusetts for law school, at harvard, university. they lived together for about three weeks at that time. many years ago. here's jay carney. >> what i can tell you, ed -- thank you for the question -- is that back when this arose, folks looked at the record, including the president's book, and there was no evidence they had met. there was -- and that was what was conveyed. nobody spoke to the president. when omar obama said the other day, and there were reports he said the other day, that president obama, back when he was law school student, stayed with him in kim bridge. i thought it was right to ask him, and t
the unborn, also the poor and the -- those are the marginalized immigrants. so this cuts across a lot of different terrain and really is not just about a challenge to one political party or another. it's a challenge to all political parties. and to everybody that votes. his challenge is to really say, what is it really mean to be a christian and how am i going to take those values and make a difference to make this society and this world a better more peaceful more just place. >> so john the church may not be intentionally political but it most certainly has a political impact and the pope certainly has a political impact in the u.s. what do you see the downstream effect being of his influence and charisma in the u.s. in >> i think this pope speaks with real authenti authenticity. the comments that he's making right now on capitalism and the need to regulate our markets in a prudent way go back a very long way. and as father said that's traditional church teaching really -- >> i have to stop you john right there, thanks to our guests this evening, we will see the rest of you online. >
mccain's top aides on immigration. she is now going to be part of the office and advising him on immigration. do you think that is a positive sign? guest: a positive sign. we have more than 11 million undocumented individuals who live in this country who should be part of the mainstream to the extent we can create a pathway to citizenship, that is tough is tough butthat fair, that make sure people can pursue gainful employment and make sure no one has a serious criminal record. you have 11 million undocumented immigrants. you can engage in mass deportation. the status quote is unacceptable. or you can pursue copperheads of immigration reform. that is the course that is most effective. host: do you agree with the president? is the course that is most appropriate. >> do you agree with the president when he says that the only way to get it done is by step-by-step? the day, ind of think it is important for a bill to be brought to the floor of the house of representatives and frost to find something that can be passed at conference committee. for talking with us. the houses in earl
, and wendy as well. james from senior disability and peter from the immigrant legal resource center, nancy cross, don nunly from the aims project, coline from the cap pain for a better nutrition and mopsy from the center of health and uc beckerry public health >> next speaker? >> good morning, my name is alex and i am a senior disability action. and even though there are meal sites and home delivered meals for seniors and people with disabilities that demand that such meals as stated in the funding can provide. and in 2006, the cap between the number of meals served and the number needed was between 6 and 9 million needs. annually. and the last three years, the budget for the home delivered meals has been cut and what needs to happen is that the money needs to be increased. and there is a long waiting list and it has to be paid with young people with disabilities and they tend to fall through the cracks, on the list of needs food is on top along with housing more money for food. >> thank you. >> next speaker. >> with reference to the sros one of the things ha they are asking for is that th
for the workforce. definitely have passed the young people that were part of my program they were immigrants most emigrated like in the last 3ish years so they had a huge learning curve and i maid they were prepared to go to work and learn the laws that applies as a young person in san francisco. that's a lot more direct services. in terms of what i do i'm the coordinator for the hall of justice that focuses on sfeesh for people with high barriers to employment. and kind of identify what our barriers for adults in the services. so trying to see how we can help people with different abilities like access like the workforce system in san francisco so we have a really good department economic workforce development but for district 11 we found there's a lot of people that are again limited english spanking speaking so they have bad barriers they might have documentation issues and not enough time or experience there's a mri i can't do of different barriers. so we're trying to figure out ways to support them and a not just training them but also trying to advocacy in terms of workers rights and buildi
statements. it was founded in nineteen sixty four demonstrated against immigrants and help find in protest. the petition is to ban the conti say the npt states that the house key in town and we cannot see some folks do list that is the npd the nep a nation is defined by ethnicity. it's a biological tissue not a legal question as to which you can become a naturalized citizen i did get done the testimonies of frequency nice mold the interior has to say the de resistance is resisting. i put yourself in the place of someone who lives in eastern germany and looks different than the average german store has different political opinions for these people the npc has a real threat. it's been on an itch to get up the sixteen teams in the dispute is the npd gets one the hoff me endurance and pecans. that means the same counties. take no cost to the beach the two mindsets this photo this is a quote from the npd parliamentary leader in my state it did in two thousand and nine he said that the npt is purely a tool to do maximum damage to the multi party state and it was in too much i think that's it. at
are typically immigrants, seniors, families and there is a disproportionately high number of children as well as some of our city's lowest income and longest term residents. they live in very affordable units but lack tenant rights. a study in district 11 showed that 45% of residents and in-laws don't even have written leases with their landlords. for many year, there have been significant calls for legalization, inlaw secondary units are simple and cost effective methods of increasing our cost effective supply, organizations from spur to the housing action coalition and tenant organizations have encouraged our city to consider legalization, but unfortunately, we have had a don't ask, don't tell policy, we have turned a blind eye to inlaw policies, it has eliminated an average of 100 in-laws each year. what i'm proposing today is that we adopt a voluntary policy in the city to allow for the legalization of in-laws, we allow owners to voluntarily approach the city to legalize one existing inlaw unit without an additional permit. in my legislation, it would waive local planning rules that don't
a goal to reignite the immigration reform debate and those will being delivered at 11:00. >>> dale smith reported engine trouble and asked for a place to land safely. this is video of the plain they are asking for help. earlier in the week crews reported hearing am hearing something. >>> officials say the teacher walls shot to death as he was jogging. we don't know the teacher's name yet but they say he taught chemistry and came from texas. this shooting comes after ambassador chris stevens and three other -- chris stevens and three others were shot after the 9/11 attacks. >>> it was sue toed to be the first game cleared. what caused them to be sent back to the united states. >>> the smoke was getting heavier and heavier. >> another break down on the term bart strandings, what happened inside a loose bay area. >>> we will tell you more about the morning commute and the bay area weather, stay tuned. >>> and we have e-mails on all of these cold temperatures and we have some record-setting temperatures and what about some low snow levels for friday night. . >>> time now 5:45 time for the la
york. and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration and naturalization service. hi, jess. i see you're finally getting a new neighbor. you mean the place next door ? a good thing. i don't like a vacant building. it makes the whole place look shabby. especially next to our glamorous establishment. could you tell what kind of business it's going to be ? no. the windows are all covered with paper. as long as it's not another restaurant i don't care who moves in there. you know what would be good ? a really nice dress shop. - that's a terrible idea. - why ? -we'd spend all our money there. -i don't think it's going to be a dress shop. they were loading in big, heavy boxes this morning, much too big for dresses. what kind of store sells big, heavy things ? - maybe it's a health club. - oh, that's not good. why not ? it might do you some good to join a health club. all day long there will be banging and clanging and loud music. our customers like to eat in peace and quiet. - hi, sara. - hi, mr. brashov. looks like
obama and the delay with the immigration case and the delay in the mandate and the libya case which the republicans lot of and the carbon emissions case that went up to the circuit court, they lot of every single case in any court of law they tried using and lot of everything in a court of public opinion. >> for him to say he is going against it is settled by the stream court. you are going after conservative supreme court with the law of the land. >> it's the point that you get down to with republican opposition with the president. it's not the specifics, but the fact that he is attempting to use any powers of the president and isn't that what gets down to the feeling that a lot of minorities have about the basic disrespect for his ability to be president. >> absolutely. if you look at president bush, he won with 51% of the vote. he had swagger and said this is what i'm going to do and every member of congress was behind it. the president won almost a landslide election and the majority voted him in and every time he tries to negotiate anything, he is being in competition. there is
conducting believe that place today's space needle is making me with that holds the seat towards immigrants and on saturday at the very idea of the eu. it was still the main street crossing enough to cause that just adds to the right to that effect but to get to date the conference can said that since starting the bit that's still on the liberals dying as today the dac. i love the great wall said nanny she represented the albion alliance be simple. there is a haunting prepared to stand up to the far right. when so many are simply moving on to their ground in the hope of recovering lost books of the few skepticism existence here in opinion polls to see it in people's attitudes. we have to convince people that is the european union brings us a lot of benefits but needs reform. ppd is to continue to bring us the benefits of. makes it to the grace that but suddenly swimming and getting the tights. why do liberals have to fix months before the european elections to convince a skeptical that the debate eu integration is in good faith. meanwhile the lights will be whacking just as hearts can incr
than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's success. >> i used my-- as a motivation. today as an education-- educator i tell my students don't use your personal issues as an impediment, to come to school. sues it as a motivation. because it will pay off. >> reporter: he says the words in life of one of africa's greatest elders will long inspire. >> and this is the person i was talking about, nelson mandela. >> he paved the way for others. and i think that cycle should only continue, if you want to have a better world. >> reporter: many will remember how nelson mandela changed the world, including one kid in the bleachers who was moved to try to do the same one classroom at a time. >> there is no easy walk to freedom anywhere. >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >> pelley: in a moment, bill clinton's very personal remembrance. of nelson mandela. too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affe
the cooperation between the two areas and you are going to need immigration sooner or later if you want your economy to continue growing and that immigration will come naturally from latin america. that even has a political dividend here so there is a tremendous opportunity for the u.s. in latin america. of course china is very interested in latin america's energy resources, and our water, in our biodiversity and if they want to invest latin america will welcome it. >> thank you. we are almost out of time but for asking one more question couple of housekeeping matters to take care of. first of all i would like to remind you of our upcoming speakers. on december 10 we have the honorable mayor of houston texas. on december 16th 16th dan nickerson chairman and ceo of general motors and on december 19, ricky skaggs grammy award-winning and bluegrass legend. second i would like to present our guest with the traditional national press club coffee mug full fleet to be filled with colombian coffee. [applause] and for the final question you mentioned the good prospects of colombia's national team. th
immigrants who know something about harsh cold winters. this guy has some advice for californians. >> you guys should man up. it's is not even freezing yet. >> quit complaining? >> quit complaining. >> reporter: at this nursery in pleasant hill, there was worry about keeping plants protected. tonight's temperatures could be a death sentence if precautions aren't taken. >> an unfortunate part of some plants that you have protected if frost aren't going to be protected from freezes. >> reporter: frost blankets were hot sellers. >> i used dish towels and pillow cases. >> they survived? >> they survived. >> reporter: a reminder to bring your furry friends inside, especially the oldest, and youngest thumbs. >> a good rule of them is if you don't want to be outside, your pets don't want to be outside. this is a very vulnerable time for pets with short air. >> reporter: a bed warmer you pop in the microwave keeps your pet toasty for hours. tonight is probably going to be a three dog night. live in walnut creek, ken wayne, ktvu, channel 2 news. >> ahead of tonight's cold weather, the homeless al
. a couple of solutions. the modern setters movement. where if you're an undocumented worker or immigrant, move to detroit. if you work hard and clean it up, you have it. it's yours. you solve two problems at once. lisa depasquale wrote an article on the $20 million in art owned by detroit, if they sold that, they could take care of this. sell is art. final suggestion, put trump in exampl charge. he cuts through the red tape. like him or not. >> let's skip ahead. ed haenry with jay carney. asking what he meant by saving detroit? >> is the president going the let detroit go bankrupt? >> i think that happened awhile ago. >> didn't he say it would be awful if they went bankrupt? it wasn't enough to help the auto industry. i think in the campaign, he said it would be horrible. >> i think there is enormous hardship caused by what is happening in detroit. this needs to be resolved between the city and it creditors. >> look, i know, ed couched it in president obama mentioned the auto industry. >> as i recall, the president's answer was vague. they left it vegas. because michigan at the time, mig
. if they worked a shorter schedule but got productive things passed like a farm bill, like immigration reform, like an increase in minimum wage i think that wouldn't be an issue how many days they are in. it's the fact they don't seem to be working and producing anything. i have great respect for senator hutchison, did a great job in the senate and is just the type of person we need back in the senate but i don't think it's a tough call on minimum wage. we can't let a single mom with two kids continue to earn the minimum wage when it hasn't, as you said, been adjusted for inflation since 1991. the chamber always says it's going to cost jobs but that's never the case. i raised the minimum wage in pennsylvania and we had three of the best job growth years after that that we've had in decades in pennsylvania. when president clinton raised the minimum wage, same cry but it didn't happen. i agree with senator hutchison, do a separate carveout for students paid at a lower wage as opposed to adults trying to protect themselves and their families, that makes sense. that's reasonable. there ought to b
an entirely different narrative. they truly seemed to believe -- >> i grew up in an immigrant neighborhood. my mother was portuguese, and we were sounded by many engineers later -- explaining that the afc was formed in 1812. we get rally angry with me and said you go back to england, or portugal, and i feel in a way that nelson mandela allowed somebody like him to find his humanity again. it is very difficult, as you say. so it was possible in a sense, possible looking out of your window and seeing the oppression. which i am surprised people didn't see. so yes, the country we come from, and what nelson mandela has lead us to is nowhere near what it was. >> today these two cities there's nothing between them, really, but when you drive through and it you see the down ship of al expand drea in the middle, it was built so that white people could drive. is really never see it. you could see beyond some trees and then you go off and there would be several million people living without electricity, and without running water who came to be your gardners and your servants and would clean your car and
you is commissioner of the ins, if you choose to ignore pat leahy on its immigration issue, you do it at your peril. senator leahy does a lot of things that are below are screamed that make a good difference in the lives of a lot of people who would otherwise fall through the cracks. she is not a show horse. he is a workhorse. pat leahy has been a long-time leader in the international campaign against land mines. in fact, in 1992, he offered the first bill of any government anywhere to be on the export of these very horrible weapons. in fact come he spearheaded the effort in congress to aid the guns of landmine by creating a special fund known as the leahy were picked and signed. that fund has now on an annual basis provide about $12 million of aid to the victims of these horrible bombs. in 1997, senator leahy sponsored historic legislation appropriately known as the leahy law, which prohibits u.s. department of state and department of defense for military from police forces to engage. there's something essential to our mission at human rights first denies refugee protection. the c
immigration reform. that is the course that is most effective. host: do you agree with the president? is the course that is most appropriate. >> do you agree with the president when he says that the only way to get it done is by step-by-step? the day, ind of think it is important for a bill to be brought to the floor of the house of representatives and frost to find something that can be passed at conference committee. for talking with us. the houses in early for session. virginia foxx to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the prayer will be offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. eternal god, we give you thanks for giving us another day. we pause in your presence and ask guidance for the men and women of the people's house. enable them, o god, to act on what they believe to be right and true and just, and to do so in ways that show respect for those with whom they disagree. send your spirit of peace upon our nation. endow the members of thi
in at least 15 with tips. 25-year-old andy kim who immigrated from south korea went through the program and is now a full-time stylist. >> first time i could have taken this very well, but a lot of people helped. >> reporter: he's making more than $30,000 a year but he knows there's great opportunity for growth in a high end salon like this. owner diane fisher says all it takes are the skills required along with hard work and a very nice salary could follow. >> there's been some that make 200,000 a year. >> reporter: styling hair? >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think about that? >> i think it's wonderful. it makes me feel really good. i love it! >> that was peggy fox reporting. local career counselor colleen smith says waiters at nice restaurants, temp workers and seasonal workers can make more than $15 an hour. >>> you've got problems and our wusa9 call for action team is getting results. we are solving consumer disputes across our area. a dishwasher was ordered online with installation from a big box retailer. when the workers came out to install it, they could see it was damaged
to immigration reform and whatnot. this is of education, an issue. showing an issue about whether the results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that lies in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill that has two republicans from new york state. i give them huge props for being part of it, hannah and grim. sailpre-k bill should through. if people want to make a smart investment, that should sail through but for the ideology of what the federal government should be spending. this,at is sad about states like oklahoma, you know, have shown us that pre-k really works. so we are fighting for it. i don't really know what its prospects are. i don't feel as hopeful as i wish -- you know, as the evidence should dictate. but we are fighting, fighting, fighting for that pre-k bill. number two, i think we could see a bill about career t
things? >> the first thing i would actually like to see in congress is comprehensive immigration reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there is a path there that a lot of people compromised on to create the path to citizenship plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy, and we make sure our borders are secure. and so first and foremost, the house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the fast for families yesterday. i have been arrested on the whole process of trying to get to immigration reform and whatnot. in terms of education, this is an issue. pre-k is an issue about showing whether the results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters, or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. we have seen pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that lies in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill that has two republicans from new york st
. a suburb of boston, the child of two immigrants from india. inlived in a house bedford, massachusetts, a middle-class town. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own and never held a job before. she faced going back to india are going on welfare to support her two children. , we would've been stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities to be limited. she made that tough choice. she states. we stayed. we were on welfare. on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to pay for rent. but because of a series of fortuitous events, we were able to remain in bedford thomas and i was able to go to school. a job as atually got travel agent. by the time i was 11, i am proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. i know i'm here also because a lot of people worked hard to expand opportunity. it's hard to share my story, but i know that we live in cynical times. it is easy to dismiss the fights in washington is par
that federal benefit. >>> people who want immigration reform will deliver more than 27,000 letters to congresswoman's lockran's office. the goal, to re-ignite the immigration reform debate. those letters will be delivered at 11:30 this morning. >>> it's 7:40. the investigation continues into the latest breakdown on the b.a.r.t. tracks. engineers are blaming an electrical short circuit for yesterday morning's big problem on the train heading to the tunnel in the east bay. the emergency brakes locked up, filling the train cars with fumes. several riders then went to the hospital after being stuck on the crippled train for an hour. >> used to be a huge problem about a decade ago. but they did some fixes to a break box and it only happens very rarely. >> b.a.r.t.'s chief mant tense officer says it will take at least a day to determine what led to the short. >>> and dozens of people in san leandro rushed from their homes out into the bitter cold in 20 minutes. a live report on an early- morning apartment fire. the damage it caused and where it may have started. >>> it might be hard to g
to need immigration reform that grows the economy and takes people out of the shadows. we're going to need targeted initiatives to close those gaps. [applause] but here's an important point. the decades-long shifts in the economy have hurt all groups -- poor and middle class, inner city and rural folks, men and women, and americans of all races. and as a consequence, some of the social patterns that contribute to declining mobility that were once attributed to the urban poor -- that's a particular problem for the inner city -- single-parent households or drug abuse -- it turns out now we're seeing that pop up everywhere. a new study shows that disparities in education, mental health, obesity, absent fathers, isolation from church, isolation from community groups -- these gaps are now as much about growing up rich or poor as they are about anything else. the gap in test scores between poor kids and wealthy kids is now nearly twice what it is between white kids and black kids. kids with working-class parents are 10 times likelier than kids with middle- or upper-class parents to go through a
down as the year of missed opportunities on immigration, tax reform budget. all issues leaders wanted to tack al at the start of the year. they had trouble funding the government and running out of time to pass critical legislation. american families could see milk prices spike to $7 a gallon if congress can't pass the farm bill by the end of the year. lawmakers are running out of type to set funding and policy for the pentagon next year. they still need to confirm janet yellen as the next federal chair before bernanke's term ends next month. it's no wonder one house committee chose to focus on a less invasive topic, space aliens. >> is there life out there? what do they think about new york city? >> reporter: congress has passed 56 bills in 2013 in the past 66 years only three other times that congress has passed less than 100 bills in a single year. many of the bills this congress passed were simply extensions of older laws that were set to expire. hope appears to be dwindling for the small deal between house and budget leaders that wanted to replace the federal s
,000 in the united states. immigration officials are reviewing the plan. now it's time for another episode of steve talks to the judge. >> thank you very much, brian. you have the right to remain silent is taking on a whole new meaning in the state of texas. a controversial new policy requires dallas police officers involved in shootings to wait 72 hours before giving a statement. what will that lead to? could it lead to a coverup? let's talk to fox news judicial senior analyst judge andrew napolitano. explain the back story. why is dallas doing this? >> the back story is a dallas police officer in the course of his duties shot and killed someone and in the person of filling out the report said the person he shot and killed lunged at him with a knife. then it turns out there were videotapes and there was no lunging and no knife. now the cop is being investigated for excessive use of force. could be a murder charge, could be nothing. what happens? the police unions in dallas pressured the chief to say we shouldn't have to give our version of the killings until we talk to everyone else involved, unti
once ambitious second term agenda including immigration reform and addressing the nation's infrastructure needs. republicans are already building their 2014 congressional election campaign around obamacare. if they're able to win the senate and hold on to the house, obama will be a very lame duck for his last two years in office. let's bring in juan williams, our fox news political analyst. the first question for you juan, what do you think about his op-ed there? >> i think that is on target, jon. i mean look, right now as doyle points out, republicans have focused on obamacare. they have 80 plus percent of republicans unified behind opposition to obamacare. as you know, there are a lots of disputes within the party on lots of social issues, budget, all that, but not when it comes to obamacare. so now, they're trying to expand that to independents. again, when you look at the poll numbers, independents not sold. very much in fact dissuade by the president's performance in the rollout of the websites. so he lost among independents. he is losing some among democrats. and th
immigration, integration of highly skilled individuals, corporate tax reform come overseas profits, international trade and simplifying the streamlined regulation for improving the communication and the infrastructure and the sustainable budget and responsible development of american gas and oil reserves as important component of competitiveness worldwide. first i wanted to ask a little bit about do you think that it's possible to develop these reserves responsibly, is that the epa position? >> i believe so. >> tell me a little bit about what you think the approach should be and i want to give you time because i don't feel like -- you get interrupted sometimes when you try to get these answers. what should be the approach to the development of this i would ask you to touch on two things in particular. one is obviously water and supply and quality that the emission of gas including methane which is a super public and and also how you would avoid the double regulation because i understand there's other agencies in the government who may be doing things that are overlapping. >> there'
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